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The History behind Hairdressing Part 2

The Dawn of the Woodstock Era

Freedom and independence helped liberate women’s rights during the 1960-70s however, sending cookie-cutter, women’s hair styles out the window. Hippies, and African Americans of this era were known for their natural locks, and Afro styles. Women’s hair styles like the angular bob and pixie were also created in order to fall into place without endless hours of primping and styling.

Defining the decade, Madonna owned the 1980’s, and every teenager wanted her frosted, scrunched hair. Mouse was also commercially launched and hair got bigger, and brighter as we all remember the crazy haircolor, curled bangs & glamour shots!

Imperfect or messy locks gained popularity during the early 1990’s while the spirit of “what-ever” eventually gave way to cleaner, bouncier, women’s hair styles like the “Rachel” made famous by Jennifer Aniston that sent women running for blowouts, and flat irons.

Today

Today however women are swapping their go-to styles for new shapes, haircolor, textures, and lengths as there are now products for every design. The variation of women’s hair styles is as wide as the freedom of using anyone of them. No more uniformed values, only subtle general trends. Even advertisements for hair products tend to emphasize on individuality and personal choice. At this time, almost everything is allowed! So don’t be afraid to try something new. Express yourself. You never know. What you & your hairdresser come up with might be the next great trendsetter!

References:

http://www.youbeauty.com/hair/galleries/the-history-of-hair#1

The truth behind your favorite hairstyles

We’ve all heard or experienced hair disappointment horror stories. Perhaps you finally worked up enough courage to try something daring and new only to look in the mirror and realize short or colored hair wasn’t meant for you. New hairstyles are something you want to consult with your hairstylist before doing anything drastic or permanent.

Unreal Expectations: Would the real hairstyle please stand up?

Be realistic. When it comes to women’s hair we always want what we can’t have. Over the years it’s become harder, and harder to define what “natural” hair actually is and how hair enhancements like wigs, weaves, and extensions play a huge role in how we view, and define beauty these days. In reality, we all know the number bleaching or haircolor can have on your hair. Ever wonder how Gwen Stefani’s platinum locks always looks so healthy and silky smooth? Think about it. When you bring your stylist a picture of a hairstyle you’d like to try keep in mind that the magazine tear-out may either be photo-shopped or the celebrity you’re looking at is actually wearing a wig.

Most celebrities these days wear front-lace wigs or hair extensions. From Beyonce, to Rihanna, to Lady Gaga, and Katy Perry, rarely do any of these women expose their real hair to the camera. There’s also the magic of Photoshop. Not only does this tool give celebrities the option of adding final touches providing them with flawless looks, it is also used to erase imperfections and undesirable details.

Keep it real when it comes to your next salon visit. If you bring your stylist a photo of a haircut with pin straight hair, and light wispy layers but you have thick curly hair, you may just be setting yourself up for disaster. In reality, if you want your hair to look like that of a celebrity you’re going to have to put forth some major effort in order to maintain it. Instead, embrace your hair’s natural thickness and texture before finding photos of hairstyles that may be impossible to recreate. Talk to your stylist about hairstyles that will work with the hair you actually have.

Keep an open conversation with your stylist

We all know it’s important to sit down for a chat with your stylist. If you’re thinking about trying something fresh or permanent, the consultation is the most important part of your new look. Schedule at the very least a 10-15 minute consultation when you book your next appointment. It’s important for your stylist to see what your hair looks like dry, how you style it, how healthy it is, and how much time you really put into it.

Even if you’re meeting with the same stylist you’ve used before, a consultation is important. The goal of a consultation is to make sure you and your stylist are on the same page before any drastic changes are made. Think about it. Would you not want to consult with an architect or contractor before remodeling your home? The same goes with your hair.

Lastly, trust your stylist & their judgment. Know that you are in good hands, and they want you to be happy with your hair. Chat about what you liked and didn’t like from your last visit. Were the bangs too short? Did you want more of a face-frame cut? Was the shoulder length perfect? Talk about those details with your stylist so he/she can grasp where to go next.

Ciao!